Trendcrusher

Posts Tagged ‘bangalore

Orchid

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Bangalore progressive act Orchid first landed on my radar in 2016 with the release of their self titled EP. I caught them live at Ctrl Alt Delete 10 soon after that and was impressed with their performance. Just over 2 years later, they are back with their debut album Miasma. The album is another juggernaut and builds on the twisted foundation of their EP.

I spoke to the band ahead of the album release about Miasma, the album inspiration and also their upcoming show this weekend in support to The Ocean Collective.

Read the interview on Unite Asia

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January 9, 2019 at 10:39 am

Aempyrean

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Aempyrean are the latest Indian metal act to send ripples through the metal blogosphere. Since forming in early 2015, the band have slowly built a reputation with their live act. I managed to catch Aempyrean at the Trendslaughter IV earlier this year supporting Cult of Fire and they put on a engaging show. Fireborn, their highly anticipated debut EP releases today via Cyclopean Eye Productions. The band’s intense sound will appeal to fans of old school death metal.

I spoke to vocalist BR about Fireborn, their inspirations and also the current state of death metal.

Read the interview on VM Underground

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December 5, 2018 at 11:33 pm

Rainburn interview

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Unscene promoter Bantering Ram has good taste in music, so when he recommended Rainburn – Insignify, I knew I had to listen to it.  The first full length release by the Bangalore prog rockers is a concept album. The story line is well complemented by melodic riffs which result in multiple listens.  

I spoke to  vocalist/guitarist Vats Iyengar about Insignify, line up changes and also their upcoming tour.

You released your first album Insignify earlier this month. How does it feel now that the album has been released?

A lot of satisfaction at how well the vision and efforts of nearly two-and-a-half years have panned out. And more prominently – because I can’t sit still for too long – planning the way forward from here.

For those not familiar with the band. Do share how the present line up of the band get together?

We did a tour in late 2016 with Coshish, and less than a month before the start of the tour, thanks to the absence of any discernable work ethic in our beloved indie scene, we suddenly found ourselves without a bassist and a second guitarist. We were in a pretty tough place – if you know our music, you know it’s not something that people can just come in and nail overnight or wing their way through. Prav and I were very lucky to find Paraj and Ravi, who worked really hard over that short period of time, and the tour turned out well. They’ve been with us ever since (Paraj is part of the live line-up).

Insignify is a concept album. Do tell us more about it.

Insignify is a story about the search for significance amidst life’s inherent meaninglessness. It is centred around notions of insecurity and narcissism – two traits whose roots often lie in the need to feel special/significant. The protagonist of the story is a musician because, in my experience, performing artists are more prone to those two traits than regular people are. The choice of main character also made it easier to write from an autobiographical point of view, which makes the whole thing really honest.

What are the concept albums that have inspired you?

In no particular order, Quadrophenia by The Who, The Shaming of the True by Kevin Gilbert, Operation: Mindcrime by Queensryche, and Remedy Lane by Pain of Salvation.

There were also a couple of albums that influenced me in terms of what not to do – The Wall by Pink Floyd for teaching me to not get so carried away by the concept that the music starts to feel secondary or indulgent. And Scenes from a Memory by Dream Theater taught me to avoid making a concept album that’s focused more on a complicated story, and not enough on addressing or evoking what you call basic human emotions. I love both those bands but I have to say, these particular albums aren’t my favourite things by them.

What was the writing process of the album? What came first, the concept or the music?

The concept came first, although a few guitar riffs and such from different points in the past made their way into certain songs. It took a long time to fully develop the story but once the conceptual details were in place, the songwriting happened quite quickly.

The album was recorded with Thejus Nair at  Eleven Gauge Recordings. What was the recording process?

Thejus is a huge part of how this album sounds, not just in terms of his role as a mix engineer but also his input on arrangements, and even things like guitar tones during pre-production. I must say this is as much his album as any Rainburn member’s. The recording process was surprisingly simple and streamlined, considering the musical breadth of the record.

What’s currently on your playlist?

Reflections of a Floating World by Elder. In the past, I never really got into much – I guess you’d call this stoner metal, but someone recommended this album to me recently and it’s great. I’ve also been listening to a fair amount of hip-hop lately.

Do you have any shows/tours planned in support of the album?

We’re touring in February in support of the album. No dates/venues finalized yet, those will come together over the next few weeks, but a tour’s happening for sure, and I hope to see everyone who’s reading this out there at the shows!

Thanks for answering all our questions. Do you have any final words?

Thanks for doing this interview. To your readers: please check out Insignify and drop us a message on our website or social media pages, letting us know what you think.


Written by trendcrusher

November 29, 2018 at 12:53 am

Sandesh Shenoy

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Trendslaughter Festival is one of the few metal only festivals in India. Started in 2012, the festival has featured underground bands from around the world like Demilich, Impiety and also Indian bands. The headliners for the second edition of the upcoming edition of Trendslaughter festival is Czech black metal band Cult of Fire, their first live performance in Asia, making it one looked forward to by many.

I spoke to Sandesh Shenoy, one of the people behind the festival. About the 6th edition of the festival, how the line up is curated and also their plans for the rest of the year.

Read my interview on Unite Asia

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February 20, 2018 at 11:00 am

Djinn & Miskatonic

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Djinn & Miskatonic are a doom metal band from Bangalore, India. Their debut album Forever in the Realm was the first Indian release by Transcending Obscurity. The album received rave reviews from around the world and further strengthened Bangalore reputation as the Doom metal capital of India. Last month, the band released their  sophomore album Even Gods Must Die. The album takes forward the sonic template established on their debut album with a few surprises.

Read my interview with vocalist GK and bassist JP on Unite Asia

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February 2, 2018 at 6:23 pm

Bantering Ram (Unscene)

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In the past decade of blogging, I’ve mainly interviewed bands and recently also records label owners. Starting this week, I will be featuring the individuals that work behind the scene to make shows happen, the organizers.

Earlier this year, a new series of gigs called Unscene was launched in Bangalore. Each month founders, Abhijit Rao (Escher’s Knot) and Bantering Ram program a killer lineup of artists, which makes me wish I lived in Bangalore instead.

I wanted to know about Unscene spoke to Ram about the origins, memorable moments so far and their plans for the future.

Hi Ram, you’ve just wrapped up the 6th edition of the Unscene series of concerts. How does it feel looking back?

Reasonably satisfying that we’ve managed to keep it going and that we’ve brought in a number of bands that have been ear-openers for our audience. Bu it’s never enough, man. We could always do better.

For those not familiar with Unscene, do tell us about its origins and also the motivation behind starting the series of shows?

Back when I used to be a frequenter of Bengaluru gig venue, CounterCulture (no longer operational now) a few years back, I used to talk to Abijith Rao (musician/sound engineer/biker and very good friend now) who was part of that setup then about reviving metal music gigs in the city, which had gone into sharp decline. I’m not even a metalhead but I thought it was an unfortunate state of affairs and in an extreme way epitomised the difficulties in the independent music space in India. The more I saw gigs, the more I realized that it was a problem for even non-metal bands. Lots of good bands but not seen and heard enough. However, it remained a thought and a few well-meant conversations for some time. After the Progworks On Wheels tour in 2016, though, I thought I was sufficiently prepared to actually do something about it. I broached the topic with Nikhil Barua of The Humming Tree, Bengaluru who was very open to it. After talking to Abijith, we then pitched it as a rather ambitious monthly series of back-to-back to Metal and non-Metal music nights. Nikhil loved the idea of expanding the space for genres and bands and backed us to the hilt on this.

The name, Unscene, is hardly original; it’s a fairly obvious and in my opinion, a mildly pompous, play on what is called the ‘scene’ and going away from ‘scene’ things as also on the unseen or rather, less seen, nature of the musicians. However, I will stress that this is NOT a platform for newbies nor an open-mic gig. The bands that have played and will continue to play are formed of solid musicians. e.g the Anand Bhaskar Collective has been around and done well before playing on the first edition of Unscene. But it was the first time the band played in Bengaluru despite having tried to get a gig here for a long time.

This is not a living for me but it gives life to some of the things I want to do. I do it because I want to. It’s as simple and perhaps, as selfish as that.

Unscene is over 2 days, one metal and the other alternative. What was the reason behind splitting the bands and audience over 2 days?

The second day is not just Alternative. Let’s say, it’s non-metal. Part of the answer is in my response to the previous question. As much as it appeals to my subversive mind to have an ambient, jazz/R&B/electronica-influenced band like Signal W smack in the middle of the Doom/Death Metal of a Primitiv and the Prog outpouring of a Pineapple Express, it might just get a little too much for an audience to deal with. The 2-day format allows us to have more bands play in an edition and widens our audience.

How do you select the bands that will perform at shows?

That’s quite simple. It’s not just about how about good they are – that’s always such a relative measure and we don’t claim to being final arbiters of what constitutes ‘good’ music – we have to like their music. No point in doing something that lacks personal conviction. Then it’s a question of fitting in with what we’re programming on an edition while also keeping cost in mind. And yes, if we get to know that a band is a bunch of jerks to deal with, they can be insanely talented but I can’t have them on Unscene.

What have been the memorable moments so far? Any funny incidents?

It’s only in the 6th Edition and a bit of the 5th Edition that I’ve been able to spend a fair deal of time watching and listening to my bands since I usually am at the gate (that’s changed now thanks to the venue). I just feel very gratified when a number of people come over thrilled and happy with us for bringing over many of these bands that have impressed them. It has happened very frequently and that makes it worthwhile.

Related to that bit about my hardly getting to see these bands, in response to Siddharth Nair’s (of the Prog Metal band, Tangents) query on what I thought of his band’s performance, I let it slip that “Can’t say much because I usually come for about 5 minutes”. That didn’t come out quite right and so now “coming in 5” has become a standing joke. And I don’t think it’s going to go away quickly. 

I really like the artwork for the posters for each edition. You also give away some pretty cool stickers at the shows. Tell us about the inspiration behind this.

The artwork is all Denver Fernandes. He gets what we’re trying to do and I let him do his thing. I think some of his best work (and this is just my opinion) is seen on what he does for Unscene.

When Abijith and I were sitting about throwing out possible names for this gig series (I had pretty much made up my mind on Unscene but we still wanted to see if we could come up with anything different), we came up with a few ‘scene’ phrases that one gets to hear all the time; things that we cringe at, that we feel epitomize much of what’s wrong here. Since then, I keep coming up with these and note them down. We wanted to give something away to folk that would come for these gigs. Stickers seemed like a good idea. So now I say often in half-jest that I organize these gigs just so I get to put these stickers out.

What is next for Unscene? What are your plans for the coming months?

Next? I continue doing these gigs. Although there’s been talk of taking it to other cities, it makes no sense to me. I’d rather focus on getting this in better shape, get more people to come for these shows, make it financially viable, increase the geographic spread of bands that Unscene brings in.

Thanks for answering all my questions. Do you have anything else to add?

It’s been my pleasure. I have plenty more to add – not for nothing is that Bantering Ram moniker. But I’d rather end with a cautionary note. It’s easy to get caught up in the hype and hoopla but the independent music space in India is not in great shape. For it to change for the better, everyone – organizers/promoters, venues, bands and audiences – has to mature. A lot. I’d love for us to not have to make those snarky stickers. And for the name, Unscene, to be done away with for valid reason.

Bonus question. What are 5 Indian independent bands that the read should check out?

There are quite a few – 5 is too small a number. But still, without meaning any disrespect to the bunch not listed here and in no particular order, here are 5 that you could do well to check out.

– Dossers Urge

– The Minerva Conduct

– The Circus

– Kaihon

– The Uncertainty Principle

The album that I’m really looking forward to this year is the new one from Blushing Satellite. I’ve heard it at different stages of its production and it is such a beautiful piece of work! Yup, I couldn’t resist sneaking that 6th one in.

Check out music from all 6 bands below

 

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June 24, 2017 at 3:03 pm

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Interview: India’s Thrash Metal Powerhouse Kryptos

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Nine Circles

kryptos

With just over 2 months to go for the end of the year, there’s been another killer release from the Indian metal scene; Burn up the night by heavy metal band Kryptos. The band are one of the oldest surviving metal bands in India. Over the past 18 years they have released 3 albums.

Burn up the Night released through AFM Records features a straight up 80’s heavy metal sound which will appeal particularly to “old school” metal fans. I enjoyed the album as the songwriting and production contrasts with the sterile sounds of upcoming bands

I (Peter ‘Trendcrusher‘ K.) spoke to vocalist/guitarist Nolan Lewis about their change in sound, music videos and their recent European tour.

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October 12, 2016 at 11:22 pm