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False Flag

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False Flag are crust/hardcore band from Pune, India. The band are one of the the few current independent metal/punk bands releasing politically inspired music in India.The others being Heathen Beast and Chaos.

Find out more about origins of the band, theirs soon to be released EP and the unique cover art in my interview with guitarists Rohit Chaoji and Shaunak Phadnis below.

For those who are not familiar with the band, could you briefly tell us about your origins?

False Flag (Rohit): Few years ago, Shaunak,Prathamesh and I started jamming randomly to on-the-spot improvised grindcore. We abandoned the idea for the band mid-way, partly because we shifted our focus to a death metal project that never materialized and also because it was uninspired. However the inspiration came during Bangalore Open Air 2015,when a part of the would-be band witnessed Napalm Death live. Thus, False Flag was formed with Pushkar, Prathamesh, Shaunak and I as the first lineup.

Why did you decide to start a crust/hardcore band? What about the sub genre appeals to you?

False Flag (Shaunak/Rohit): To be honest, hardcore/crust is very stripped-down, no bullshit, honest music to me. We appreciate things that don’t have a pretense. I remember thinking around that time why there aren’t ANY crust punk bands around when the climate was ideal for it. I still don’t understand why but i guess subconsciously that led (at least me) to this.but also we were listening to a lot of Negative approach, anti-cimex, skitsystem & rakkaus at that time and ended up wanting to make songs like those bands. the songs fell in place quite fast and easily haha. The napalm death gig was a MAJOR catalyst as well. Sonically, this sound can be blended with almost every form extreme music. its fascinating. there is A LOT of scope to experiment i think since a very bare-bones stripped down crust punk song is very simple in structure etc.

Your Self titled EP is quite political especially the track Spectrum Disorder. What is the inspiration behind it?

False Flag (Shaunak): Yes, This song was a response in the aftermath of the JNU incident so its more anti-right i guess. FTII,JNU,HCU,JU,Ramjas. it just seems like one or the other kind of smear campaign from either end. also,repeatedly calling a certain something fascist does not gain you any traction at all. that much should be obvious. It seems as if the function of an ideology is to choose which “facts” should matter & justifying oppression of certain values/speech,violence of certain kind. especially the latter part does not help establishing any communication or successful dialogue at all. you can’t talk censorship and close down screenings of films in theatres or college campuses. You can’t claim to be tolerant and shut down someone because they criticized you. Also,its just fucking frustrating when we are too caught up in calling out people as bhakt/libtard/presstitute/anti-national/sanghi/fascist. like, to what end are we doing the things that we are doing? I don’t care if you are right or left, or what the state is; a strong and vehement critique of the state should always be established.

 

The cover artwork by jonty paul is quite unique. Tell us a bit more about it.

False Flag (Shaunak): haha yes. so, jonty likes to design hypothetical album covers. I have no idea how he comes up those things but i have seen him do it. He sent this image to me one day randomly(he hadn’t even heard the songs or any demos) and it just made complete sense. We did not want to go for usual high contrast black & white aesthetic in the first place. This gritty/dark style

just fell in place with the overall mood of the songs. it resonates quite well with it. In my imagination, The Album art reflects with the second song on the EP “sisyphus’ lament”. In some sense the image is the depiction of the words of the song.

Do you have any shows planned in the coming year?

False Flag (Shaunak/Rohit): We don’t have any shows planned as such yet. but we would LOVE to play as many shows as we can. actually, It would be GREAT to play a gig in bengaluru(*hint hint b’lore friends haha*)

Thanks for answering all the questions. Do you have any final words?

False Flag (Shaunak/Rohit): Thank you for doing this interview with us! to everyone reading this i am sure you’ll enjoy this small piece of emotive hardcore/crust music we put out! Please listen to it and read the words. We would love to hear your thoughts/ideas/stories and be inspired from them! Cheers!

 

This interview originally was posted on Transcending Obscurity

 

Written by trendcrusher

December 11, 2017 at 10:13 pm

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Neck Deep in Filth

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I spoke to Vishal Rai about the origins of the band, their self titled EP and also the metal scene in Nepal.

You recently released your self-titled EP at a show called The Pit. How did it go?

It went great. The Pit was put on by our old friends in Ugra Karma at the best venue in town, so it was excellent. They have air conditioning! Sold more merch and CDs than we thought we would too haha

You have all been in bands previously like Inside 2 Stoopid Triangles, Jugaa, Squirtguns and Asphyxiate. How did you decide to form a band together?

Well, we all shared a practice space that our bassist ran at one time, and with the underground being so small, we’ve known each other for awhile.

I’ve played guitar in all of my bands so this time I wanted to try my hand at vocals. All I wanted was to start a fast, raging hardcore band. Sushil, our bassist, was down. He and I have been playing in bands together since 2002. As for guitars, I knew “Straight Edge” Sandesh would deliver what we wanted. He also plays in Squirt Guns, which is probably my favorite Nepali punk band. Sandesh delivered a bit more than what I was looking for though thanks to his crust influences haha He brought in a melodic aspect to our music too, which I’m totally fine with now. We later got Sanjay a.k.a. Jeson to join. He comes from a death metal background but he fit in perfectly.

How did you get into this style of music?

I got into metal in the early/mid 90s, the regular Metallica/Slayer stuff. The Indian magazine Rock Street Journal had a huge part in shaping my early musical tastes. RSJ was the only music mag worth reading in the pre-Internet era in this region. Then, in 1996/97, I heard Rancid’s “…And Out Come The Wolves” and dove headfirst into punk. Formed my first punk band in 2001, started getting into heavier hardcore around that time, played in a few more bands, and here I am today, 35 and more into this music than ever.

Reading through your lyrics sheet, it is clear that the EP is inspired by the current political situation in Nepal. Tell us a bit more about it.

Where do I even start? Over the years, hateful, jingoistic ultranationalism has become more and more common. Then there are the privileged who are committed to maintaining the status quo, people who keep downplaying the legitimate demands of minorities. There’s the bigotry that’s on constant display. There’s the sexism and the complete lack of equal rights. And, of course, there’s the corruption.

If nothing else, it’s cathartic just screaming about the issues that piss me off.

What was the recording process for the EP? Where was it recorded?

All of it was done at our main practice space at Mr Music and another rehearsal room called Advent. We didn’t have the need to enter a proper studio. Our bassist Sushil has gotten pretty good at recording bands. He recorded my old band Childwife’s EP as well as Squirt Guns’ full length, and his work on both was great. I realized I had underestimated him all these years haha turns out 25 years of constant weed smoking hadn’t messed him up that bad yet. So yes, it was natural and, more importantly, cheap just letting him record us.

What have you been listening to lately (metal and non-metal)? Are there any acts that have inspired you of late?

I wouldn’t say I’ve been inspired by anyone, but lately I’ve been listening to a lot of Kesha, Lana Del Rey, Nicole Dollanganger, the new Incendiary, Power Trip, All Out War, Propagandhi, and Integrity albums, along with Beast Jesus, Veils, and Barred from the Philippines, as well as this great Indonesian band called Children Of Terror.

Nepal has quite a few upcoming bands. What are the bands that readers should check out?

Nepal has a bunch of great bands these days. However, I’ll limit my recommendations to those that have at least an EP out.

Strangle – Straightforward hardcore with crossover influences. Great band!

strangle1.bandcamp.com

Nude Terror – Possibly the best grindcore band in the subcontinent. Amazing live.

nudeterrornepal.bandcamp.com

Disorder – Old school thrashers will love them

Rog – Intense powerviolence from Pokhara

https://grindviolencerog.bandcamp.com/

What are your plans for this year? Do you have any more shows or a tour planned?

Yep, we’ll definitely play more shows this year. Then, in early 2018, we’re dropping a split with a friend’s band.

Thanks for answering all our questions. Do you have any final words?

Thank you for the questions. Visit neckdeepinfilth.bandcamp.com and buy our EP.

 

This interview originally was posted on Transcending Obscurity

Written by trendcrusher

October 15, 2017 at 10:00 am

death by fungi interview

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death by fungi is a hardcore punk band from Mumbai, India. Formed in 2013, the band released a self titled EP last year. Earlier this month, the released another EP, ‘in dearth of’ which features a more melodic sound.

I spoke to vocalist/guitarist Vrishank Menon about the ‘in dearth of’ EP, recording it and also their plans for the rest of the year. 

death by fungi

What made you decide to start a hardcore punk band? What about the style appeals to you?

I can’t say! I got into punk rock when I was very young, right after I got into Slayer and Metallica, but mostly listened to skatepunk bands like Strung Out and Propagandhi. As I got older, I got into eighties hardcore (Black Flag, Minor Threat), metalcore (Shai Hulud, Converge, Integrity), powerviolence (Spazz, Charles Bronson) and post-hardcore (Fugazi, Glassjaw, Nation of Ulysses).

The music was very empowering, it was fast and it broke musical convention – as a 12 year old, I loved that! I still firmly believe that most alternative genres of music we listen to today – be it alternative rock, metal, math rock, whatever – comes from hardcore and hardcore ethic.

Mumbai is a city better known for it’s metal than punk scene. How did you find like minded band members? How did the band get together?

I was very fortunate to find these people but we aren’t all that like-minded when it comes to music. I mean we all love hardcore bands like Converge and Despise You, but we come from different places, musically. I began writing punk and indie rock tunes when I was in my mid-teens and used to record songs on my own since none of my friends liked punk rock. Kamran and I grew up playing in odd bands here and there so it was natural that I’d make him play bass with me and he did. Another friend agreed to play drums but he didn’t really care. Finding Aryaman was more a stroke of luck. He used to play drums in a mathcore band with Kamran and so when our old drummer left us right before our first show, he asked Aryaman to drum for us. We had no idea but he came from a background of thrash and old-school death metal like Entombed and Morbid Angel. So he was super stoked to play fast songs with us and we all clicked immediately. The first song we jammed to was perfect and all of us established ‘musical intimacy’, if that’s a thing. We shifted to a heavy hardcore sound because of Aryaman’s influence on that band. I think we found our sound our current sound together.

cover The ‘in dearth of’ EP sounds more melodic compared to your self-titled EP. What prompted the shift in direction? Tell us a bit more about your EP.

Two songs on the EP are more melodic but the other two are much heavier than our older work. In terms of sound, we’re just doing more, not letting genre boundaries limit us. We threw in bits of post rock, skramz and emo (bands like American Football and Christie Front Drive, mind you) while fucking with time signatures and guitar tones. We just write what feels right.

What was the songwriting process for the EP? How long did it take?

It’s different for every song. Iced and Pathfinder fell together very quickly and sort of assembled themselves. I literally remember Aryaman and I spit-balling riff and drum ideas and putting together all these songs in literally less than an hour. Endless Rain and Black Lung were very different and we spent a lot of time writing those. Endless Rain was actually the first song we wrote as a band and we’ve been revising it for 2 years. We weren’t even going to put it on the EP but we had extra studio time booked, so we altered the structure and put that in.

We try to be systematic but our band works better when we’re impulsive and do things if they feel right.

The EP was recorded at That studio and a home studio. What was the recording process like? Did you try anything different this time around?

It was much better, we enjoyed the process and everything came out sounding very nice and didn’t rob us of all of our money. That Studio was great and the engineers we worked with, Anupam Roy and Abhishek Kamdar, were very helpful and added a lot to the record.

The only thing I did different was recording a lot of guitar layers.

What are your plans for the rest of the year? Do you have any shows planned?

We are recording a split with our friends from Jugaa (Kathmandu based- metallic hardcore) in the summer and I’m currently trying to book as many shows as possible. We’re also organizing DIY house shows, which should be very fun. Hopefully.

Stream/Download ‘in dearth of’ below

Written by trendcrusher

May 28, 2016 at 7:20 pm

Introducing: Grammy Winning Effort

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Grammy winning effort

Who: Grammy Winning Effort The band consists of Dayus Madhan (Vocals), Shashvat Pandit (Guitars), R N Jaidev (Guitars), Akshay Dwivedi (Bass) and Suyash Gabriel (Drums)

Where: Delhi, India

What: The band released their self titled album last week. “This album is about standing up for what you believe in and not letting societal pressures hold you back from doing what you ought to do.” said Dayus about their debut album. “It’s about giving people the courage to be who they want to be and stay true to that.”

How: “The songs were written over the span of a couple of years.” said Dayus about writing the album. “We started writing the material in 2010 roughly and as we were recording in 2011 we kept adding parts to the songs. We wanted to see what they would sound like as they were being put down before finalizing any parts.”
“This album has been a very long process.” Dayus described the recording process for the album. “We initially started recording in 2012 and were almost done with the whole project, but soon after the band ran into some trouble and we all got busy with our respective jobs at the time. So it kept getting postponed and we finally finished it up this year (2015). We had to re-track a few things and added live drums. But it sounds much better because of that.”

Grammy Winning Effort” sounds awesome, it is my new work out album. Listen to it below

Written by trendcrusher

October 21, 2015 at 10:00 am