Trendcrusher

Sleep Terror Interview

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Sleep Terror is the instrumental metal project of guitarist and composer Luke Jaeger. I learnt about Sleep Terror through Acrophase, a electro metal project Luke has with Vishal J Singh (Amogh Symphony). Last month saw the release of  Unihemispheria, a long awaited album from Sleep Terror followed by a short tour of the west coast of the United States of America.

I spoke to Luke via email about the album, the tour and also his future plans for the project.

Luke Jaeger

You just completed a short tour of the United States. How did it feel to be back on the road again?

Luke: It felt great! Been a little bit. There are a lot of mixed emotions and experiences on the road. Passion, fear, excitement, dread, joy, exhaustion, inspiration, bliss. The combination all packed in one is definitely interesting to return to.

The live line up featured Marco Pitruzzella on drums. How did he become part of the band?

Luke: We have mutually expressed interest in joining forces to do it for a couple years now as he lives nearby me. It just seemed to be spontaneous and schedule-permitting on his end for once and solid timing before this tour.

You release your new album Unihemispheria last month. Tell us a bit about it.

Luke: I’m very proud of it and consider it the official full length I always wanted to debut.

The album has been in the works for sometime now. How long have you been working on it?

Luke: It wasn’t really a planned effort over time but rather an accumulation of songs I felt integrally fitting to the Sleep Terror sound and gelled well on a tangible release.

Unihemispheria

Unihemispheria was produced by Navene Koperweis. What was the recording process? How Iong did it take?

Luke: I basically sent him the zipped WAV files of all the isolated tracks and he did a final mix and master of the songs from there. It was a fairly quick process and turned out sounding pretty beefy!

How does it compare to your previous album Probing Tranquility?

Luke: I really disliked the production of that record but I loved the cleanliness of the album performance and of course the songs. I couldn’t compare the two very drastically, it is still Sleep Terror sound and style to the max.

You have a band Acrophase with Vishal Singh ( Amogh Symphony). What the status on the band? Any new releases planned?

Luke: It was something we wrote and recorded between 2009-2011. Really cool stuff. No releases planned but things can always change there.

Do you have any tips for upcoming guitarists?

Luke: Be yourself, express yourself without aesthetic limitations and don’t be concerned with being “better” than anyone else. Music and art is about having your own unique stamp and the rest is irrelevant. More importantly, don’t ever offer your talent to a band or person running that band that thinks it is acceptable not to pay you for your hard work and creativity.

What are your plans for the rest of the year? Any more shows?

Luke: Most definitely. Recording a new 5-song EP due by Winter and definitely keeping an open mind to extensive touring to follow.

Listen to Unihemispheria below

Written by trendcrusher

August 18, 2015 at 10:00 am

Fuck the Facts Interview

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Fuck the Facts are in my opinion one of the best grindcore bands at the moment. The band have been busy in the past couple of years, they released two EPs  Abandoned (2014), Amer (2013) and earlier this year released a split album with Fistfuck. Later this month, they release their 6th full length album, Desire will Rot’. 

I spoke to drummer Mathieu Vilandre & guitarist Topon Das over email about the album, starting their own label and also their upcoming tour of US and Canada.

Topon Das (Guitar) Marc Bourgon (Bass/Vocals) Mélanie Mongeon (Vocals) Mathieu Vilandré (Drums) and Johnny Ibay (Guitar) (Left to Right) Photo Credit: Dave Levitt

Topon Das (Guitar) Marc Bourgon (Bass/Vocals) Mélanie Mongeon (Vocals) Mathieu Vilandré (Drums) and Johnny Ibay (Guitar) (Left to Right) Photo Credit: Dave Levitt

How does it feel now that you are a month away from the release of your album ‘Desire will rot’?

Mathieu Vilandré: Pretty stoked to say the least. Feels like we’ve been working on it for a long time, probably because we have. You never know how these things are going to go but we’re all happy with the end result. We’re not used to having some much time go by between albums. Even though we released a bunch of other stuff, it’s the last piece of the puzzle that we’ve been working on for the last few years.

Tell us a bit about the album.

Mathieu Vilandré: It has 11 beautiful tracks for a total of 40 minutes of pure delight. You’ll find grindcore, death metal, arena crust, noise and even Nan Bourgon. 

How does the album compare to your previous album ‘Die Miserable’?

Mathieu Vilandré: I think it is a much less “death metal” album then Die Miserable was. It’s very catchy; Jibay and Topon did a great job on all the melodies and stuff. There’s also a big difference in the production, Desire Will Rot is much cleaner and much more open then Die Miserable. Still, I think that people who enjoy Die Miserable will enjoy Desire Will Rot as well. It sounds cliché but this record sounds more mature, like the transition between peach fuzz and actual facial hair. 

desire will rot

‘Desire Will Rot’ was recorded and mixed by Topon Das at his Apartment 2 recording studio in Ottawa, ON. What was the recording process?

Mathieu Vilandré: It’s a pretty classic approach, I would say. We do at least one preproduction session to get everything in order and to make our lives easier. Topon handles pretty much every single aspect of the production. We record scratch guitars so that he doesn’t have to play and handle the board at the same time. We always start with the drums, and then we do all the guitars and bass parts plus any other extra stuff, and finally all the vocals. We took it a bit easier this time compared to Die Miserable. It has to be a fun experience or else what’s the point?

What do you feel are the main advantages of having your own studio?

Topon Das:  The studio has grown a lot over the last five years, so it’s fun to have all this at our disposal and be able to produce our own albums at a quality that we’re happy with. The studio is a very comfortable place, so even just to have it as a creative space outside of recording, helps a lot. Just to be able to build this thing up has been a very motivating experience. All that being said, it can be tough to rein it in sometimes and know when to stop. We have all the time in the world if we really want it, and that’s not always a good thing.

After releasing 3 albums with Relapse Records, what prompted you to start your own label Noise Salvation? Will there be other releases from the label this year?

Topon Das: Even though we started Noise Salvation back in October, we still shopped this new album around a bit, but got basically zero interest. We didn’t want to sit on it for another year in the hopes that something would come up, so we decided to just do it ourselves. Noise Salvation was created to be our own little label and was only ever meant for FTF releases and perhaps a few related projects. Back in January, we released a Merdarahta album, which is a side-project that Mel & I have together, then we put out the split 10” with Fistfuck. I have some other little ideas in mind for the label, but the new FTF album is keeping me busy enough now, so I doubt I’ll get around to anything else until 2016.

You will be touring USA and Canada in September and October this year. Do you have any other plans for the rest of the year?

Topon Das: We’re working on a booking a US tour that will take us more south in November and December. That’ll be it for 2015, and then we plan to go to Europe around March 2016.


Any final words?

Topon Das: Cheers and thanks for your support!

Pre-order ‘Desire will rothere. Listen to the album below

Written by trendcrusher

August 14, 2015 at 10:00 am

Nervecell – Human Chaos

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Nervecell are the oldest surviving metal band from UAE. I remember reading about them on phride.com when they first started out and since then have bought all their releases and seen them multiple times live. In the past decade, I have seen Nervecell go from a band playing club shows in Dubai to now a band that tours across the world. In 2011, they were named as one of the “Defenders of the faith” by Metal Hammer Magazine.
Nervecell’s first release, the ‘Human Chaos’ EP came out in 2004, I spoke to Barney Ribeiro, guitarist for the band about the EP and the impact it had on the band and the music scene in United Arab Emirates.

Nervecell 2004

Barney Ribeiro (Guitars), James Khazaal (Vocals & Bass) and Rami H. Mustafa (Guitars) (Left to Right)

 

“It feels great man, I distinctly remember the entire process we went through during the recording stage. At that point back in 2004, we were just another local band based in Dubai that had been around for 4 years playing the average local Dubai gig once every 2 months you know. Looking back now and considering how far the band has come since that EP is completely insane!” said Barney looking back at their first release. “It’s a fact that the “Human Chaos” EP officially put us on the metal map internationally. I remember the guys and I were really stoked by all the reviews we received that year from the EP, it really over exceeded our expectations and motivated us to keep pushing forward.”

The band started in university just like most metal bands in UAE.  “I am the only original member from the first Nervecell line-up in 2000. How I met James and Rami was almost meant to be.”said Barney about how the present line up of the band got together. “I remember we needed to record a demo (2 tracks) as a requirement to enter this Battle of the bands contest. So we knew a few friends in AUD (American University in Dubai) where we also used to perform at quite frequently who were going to help us record this demo. So during that recording session a lot of the students who went to university there kept walking in and out of the auditorium where we were recording this demo. Two of those random students walking in and out watching us that day was in fact James and Rami haha…I remember briefly exchanging a few words with them that night. Few months later we ended up becoming close friends and eventually James joined the band as the bass player and Rami soon after as the second guitarist as I was the only guitar player in the band up until 2003.”

nervecell_human_chaos

In 2004, not many bands from UAE had released an EP or album. “The idea to put out an EP only came about when we noticed the fans at the local gigs we played at started asking us how they could find or buy our music, and that sort of struck an idea with us.” said Barney about how the band decided to record their music. “So while balancing our studies (we were all in university back then) we decided to take the summer of 2004 off and hit the studio to record the “Human Chaos” EP. In our mindset back then we really didn’t have any goals as such to be the “first” or to make or break any records being a Middle East based band. Our progression as a band has always been very gradual with everything we set our minds to. I remember telling ourselves we just wanted to put something out as product and have something to look back at. None of us would ever be able to predict what the future would hold for us that’s for sure…It’s been a hell of a ride man but ZERO REGRETS!”

The EP was written while James and Rami were in UAE and Barney in Canada. “We used to write individually a lot and send each other files over the Internet. It helped stay in touch as friends but also as band members as well.” said Barney describing their writing process while he was away. “I would return home to Dubai every summer though and that was when we would line up shows as well. I mean this was all we ever wanted to do anyway, so it was kind of natural for each of us to write even though we were in different continents for that period of almost 4 years when I was away in Canada.”

Human Chaos’ was recorded by Kiran Sequeira at his home studio. “It took about 3 to 4 months actually as far as I remember. The reason it took us so long was very much due to the fact that we were working with Kiran’s schedule. The guy had a full time job so the weekdays were hard to deal with anyway, seeing that he only had so much time for us after his work.” said Barney about how recorded the album. “We would try and get as much done in sessions over the weekends but we couldn’t really get every weekend available either to work with him. Hence the reason why it took us so long again, but oh well you learn to work with what you have and one thing we definitely did not have at that point of time was a huge budget! We pretty much used the money our folks would give us to buy food and other basics while being university students to invest into that EP.”

The recording had it’s share of funny incidents. “There was this one time I was tracking guitars and Kiran’s girlfriend was sitting right behind me on the couch and stretching her hands out while she was totally engrossed watching TV with her headset on.” said Barney looking back at the recording sessions. “So she had no idea her hands were like touching my shoulders or my hair or something while she was stretching, and I of course had my headphones on too as I was recording my guitar tracks. So typically I assumed it was James or Rami trying to distract me or annoy me while here I am totally focusing on nailing my guitar parts for the EP. So basically I ended up abusing the shit out her without even knowing what was actually happening going “Stop…stop touching me you F#^ckin #%^^%%&” haha… It was hilarious because I only later noticed Rami and James sitting down away in the corner totally cracking up watching this whole awkward situation take place.”

The EP got reviews from across the world and opened up quite a few doors for the band. “Absolutely, it was totally overwhelming. We were blown away by the amount of great reviews we received week after week. I mean we sent out a few copies ourselves by mail to magazines and websites, zines etc. but we got reviews from a lot more places than we anticipated via the Internet. It was really motivating for us to be honest because we had no idea the reach we were going to receive beforehand. It was an incredible time for us man.” said Barney about the response they received. “Because of that EP we got the slot to open for the Dubai Desert Rock Festival in 2005 with Sepultura and Machine Head. As well as a tour in Australia as our first official tour ever outside the UAE, followed by a few one-off shows in Egypt (out of all places) and later on our first European Festival appearance too in Tolmin, Slovenia at Metal Camp, which is now called Metal Days Festival. So like I said, it really did open a lot of doors for us, so to say we are happy with the response would be an understatement.”

“I would personally like to re-do some of the drum tracks that were programmed on the EP.” said Barney about things that he would like to change about the release.”I mean for the time, budget constraints and facilities available in Dubai that we had back in 2004 we did the best we could. But yea looking back 10 years later I think that is the one thing I would probably change, at the same time the whole rawness of the EP is what makes it special it its own way I guess.”

Nervecell are currently working on their 3rd album. “You can definitely expect it for a 2016 release, not earlier because there is a lot that goes on before we even set a confirmed release date.” said Barney updating us on the status of the album. “We are writing music as we speak and will continue to do so for the rest of 2015. We also just recently left Lifeforce Records and signed with Unique Leader Records for the new album, so we look forward to putting out our debut with them and we can’t wait until we unleash it onto the rest of the world and see where that takes us next!”

Here is me favourite track from the ‘Human Chaos‘ EP

 

Written by trendcrusher

August 11, 2015 at 11:51 pm

Raul (Memento Mori) Interview

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Memento Mori is a Spain based label/mailorder that focuses on old school Death Metal, Doom Metal and anything in between. In the past year, there have been some great releases from bands like Morbidity, Horrified, Austerymn, Disrupted and more. I spoke to label owner Raul Sampedro about how he got into metal, the metal scene in Spain and upcoming releases from his label.

 

Memento Mori

 

How did you get into metal? What was the first metal concert you attended?

I was like 10 years old, back in 1982, and my father used to play this compilation tape (one of those “best of ” compilation tapes) on the car’s stereo. The tape featured many songs, but there were 4 of them that got stuck in my head for whatever reason: Kiss’ “Love It Loud”, AC/DC’s “Highway to Hell”, The Ramones’ “Do You Remember Rock’n’ Roll Radio?” and Status Quo’s “Whatever You Want”. That was the kickstart of my journey into Hard-Rock, Heavy Metal and Punk-Rock. Months later I started hanging about with a guy that was some 5 years older than me and it was him who’d burn lots of tapes for me, from bands such as Judas Priest, Rainbow, G.B.H., Metallica, Saxon, Manowar, Sex Pistols, Accept, Helix, Alcatrazz, Dead Kennedys, Black Sabbath, Tokyo Blade, Venom, Motörhead… The rest is history.
The first international Metal concert that I ever attended was Metallica + Metal Church, back in January 1987. Prior to that one, I had only attended shows featuring Spanish bands on the bill, such as Baron Rojo, Ñu, Sobredosis, Panzer…

Tell us how you started your label.

I had previously worked for other labels/distros in the past and I even ran a tiny label/mailorder called Acoustic Trauma Releases back in 2004-2005. But I had to fold that label/mailorder by late 2005 due to financial issues, right before moving to Finland (I lived there for almost 1 ½ years), and I guess I always wanted to restart the project whenever the odds would allow to. That happened back in 2010. Memento Mori started as a simple distro/mailorder, but soon after I felt an urge to turn it onto a label/mailorder, and put out my own releases and trade them with fellow underground labels out there. The first two Memento Mori releases (Ataraxy “Curse of the Requiem Mass” MCD and Centinex “Subconscious Lobotomy” reissue CD) saw the light of day in October 2010, and we’ve put out a total of 41 releases up to this day.

What has been your most memorable release so far and why?

Each and every Memento Mori release is like a son to me. Would a loving and unbiased father be able to point out one of his children as his favourite? All our releases are equally especial to me regardless any other consideration.

What qualities do you look for when signing a band?

I want to work with down-to-earth, humble people without any kind of rockstar attitude and an ego to feed. Other than that they also have to play the kind of stuff that I like to support through the label (Death Metal, Doom Metal, Thrash Metal and anything in between those genres) and meet a certain criteria regarding the, so to speak, “maturity” of their music. What I mean by this is, we don’t put out demos, so the band’s got to be seasoned enough as to be ready to go full-length.

Have you been part of a band? What instrument do you play?

I used to growl in a Death Metal band called Sacrophobia circa 1990-1992. Got to play live five times with them and recorded a demo titled “Only Death Is Irreversible” (Drowned Productions, 1991). Soon after leaving the band in 1992, I joined Postmortem. Thrash Metal in the Bay Area tradition was the game with them, but they wanted to give their music a more brutal edge and offered me a slot as the new vocalist. If memory serves, I only spent a couple of months with them, just practising at the rehearsal room, so no recording was made and I never got to play live with them. No more bands for me ever since.

Spain is not a country known for its metal scene. What are the Spanish bands you recommend we check out?

Well, those into classic 80’s Heavy Metal should check out the early works of Barón Rojo and Ángeles Del Infierno. Those two bands, along with Obús and Panzer, were probably the most notorious bands over here some 30 years ago. Regarding old Death Metal bands (1988-1995), I’d recommend to check out Feretrum, Suffocation / Intoxication, Obscure, Human Waste, Unbounded Terror, and also Aggressor (Thrash/Death Metal) and In Torment (Funeral Doom/Death Metal). And talking current bands, I’d recommend to check out Ataraxy, Bokluk, Graveyard, Oniricous, Banished From Inferno, Decapitated Christ, Necroven, Onirophagus, Karonte and Deprive. All of them play Death Metal. I’m sure there’s some remarkable bands into other genres, but I’m not really familiar with their music, so you guys got some homework to do.

Looking back at the past 5 years, would you change anything about your record label?

Not really. I’m quite happy with our output, the bands and people I work with, and the fans’ response. Sales and exposure could be much better, of course, but we’d need a much larger budget for promotion (not likely to happen anytime soon), or start putting out other forms of extreme -or pseudo-extreme- music that are “en vogue” these days (which is even less likely to ever happen as I’ll always stick to my own personal taste), or start doing vinyl (not really into a format that’s essentially a luxury item due to manufacturing prices and postage rates). We’ll keep struggling to survive in this trendy scene against all odds and I’ll die with my boots on if necessary.

What are your thoughts on physical format VS digital format of music? Which do you prefer and why?

I’ve never ever downloaded a single song (let alone an album), with the exception of demos and promos sent by bands for me to consider a possible signing, so make a wild guess what I think about digital music. A music album, or a book for that matter, is something that I need to touch. Simple as that. That’s why we don’t even offer downloads of our releases. I shiver in disgust at the mere thought of charging a single cent for a sheer computer file. To each his own, though. I’m just entitled to my own opinion and principles.

2014 was a great year for you with releases from bands like Morbidity, Horrified and others. What are your plans for the rest of 2015? Releases that we should look out for?

So far this year, we put out the debut full-length CD’s from Deprive, Austerymn and Disrupted, the sophomore full-length CD from Insepulto, the Transgressor reissue CD and the Misery early discography compilation CD. Coming out in a couple of weeks from today, there’s the Coffincraft debut full-length CD and a repress of the Burial reissue CD that we put out back in 2012. And then later in the year, we’ll put out the Praise The Flame, Dementia 13 and Abyssus debut full-length CD’s, and an Aldebaran compilation CD. And 2016 will also be a busy year at Memento Mori HQ’s. In fact the whole year schedule is close to be fully booked by now. I recommend all the readers to stay tuned via the website (www.memento-mori.es), the Facebook page (www.facebook.com/memento.mori.label) or even send e-mail to raulsv1972@hotmail.com and request to be added to our mailing list. Thanks for the intie. In Death, In Doom…

Written by trendcrusher

July 23, 2015 at 8:30 pm

Dying Embrace Interview

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Last July/August, Cyclopen Eye productions released “Through corridors of dead centuries“, a split between two veteran bands from the Indian subcontinent, Dusk (Pakistan) and Dying Embrace (India). I described the release as “death/doom metal recommended for those who preferred metal that sounds raw”. It was Dying Embrace first release since they got back together in 2011.

This interview was originally planned to go along with the one with Dusk however it got delayed due to various reasons. I spoke to Vikram Bhat via email about their side of the split and their future plans.

 

Dying Embrace

Vikram Bhat (Vocals), Jimmy Palkhivala (Guitars), Deepak Raghu (Drums) and Pritham Denzil D’Souza (Bass) (Left to Right)

 

Where did the idea to do the split come about? Did Sandesh from Cyclopean Eye productions have anything to do with it?

Vikram: Hello Peter , actually this split was possible only because of Sandesh of Cyclopean Eye Productions. He always spoke about this idea right from the early years, even when the band was inactive and on a hiatus at the same time even Dusk were in suspended animation and he said, if these 2 bands ever return then a split has to happen, those knowing Sandesh, he always has had it his way.

How does it feel to have your first release out in over a decade?

Vikram: It’s a very surreal feeling, a bit of deja-vu a bit of disbelief all rolled into one. We never thought the band would return back, the love and support we have got since we returned has been fantastic. It’s a great feeling to see so many fans who still remember the band even though we were gone for a good 10 years.

Tell us a bit about the songs your side of the split. What are they about?

Vikram: We have 4 original compositions and a cover on our side of the split. 3 songs and one instrumental, the songs have a very different approach and yet still retain the trademark Dying Embrace sound. A melting witches cauldron of Death and Doom Metal with several influences which the band members brought in. The songs just like our older material deal with the occult, mythology and religion.The fans will get what they have loved and liked from us over the years.

How different was the recording process this time around?

Vikram: Very different actually, recording music has seen a sea change over the past years and for us it was an all new learning experience, luckily we had Srikanth Panaman of The Doom Cave Studio producing us and he guided and showed us the newer technology we had at our disposal now. It was a great experience indeed and the band enjoyed putting the new songs together for the split CD.

What are you plans for the rest of 2014? Any plans to release a full length album soon?

Vikram: Since 2014 has passed and we are into 2015,we have a few shows lined up for the rest of the year, a 7” split vinyl EP may happen by the end of the year, we have never got down to writing a full length album ever, I don’t think that will ever happen.

Any Final words?

Vikram: 666 apologies for the delayed replies to the interview,the past year hasn’t been easy on me personally and a lot of things got pushed to the back but I still owed you this one and here it is! Thanks for the support and patience and salutes & respect to all the fans and friends who have supported us, you rule and you know who you are!

Listen to ‘Ascendance of Namtar‘ from “Through corridors of dead centuries” below

 

Written by trendcrusher

July 21, 2015 at 10:00 am

Spiral Ascent – A look back at the debut album of Kryptos

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As a collector of CDs, there are a few that stand out and one such album is Kryptos Spiral Ascent. The Bangalore based band’s debut album was incidentally the first Indian metal album, I’ve owned. Over an email interview vocalist Ganesh discusses Kyrptos’s formative years, the Bangalore metal scene and ten years of Spiral Ascent.

Kryptos - 2004

Nolan Lewis (Guitars), Akshay Patel (Guitars), Ryan Colaco (Drums) and Ganesh K (Vocals/Bass) (Left to Right)

On Kryptos’ early years:
Kryptos started out as a college band called “8 on the Richter”. “8OTR (hated the name) was a band I had put together with a bunch of dudes in late 96/97.” said Ganesh about the band. “I met Nolan at St. Joseph College of Commerce’s admission queue. We didn’t quite take to each other, but I remember our dads talking about some shit. Next thing I knew, we were in the same class and shared common tastes in heavy music. It was in passing I asked him if he played the guitar. Not only did he say yes, he owned a guitar AND an amp. That did it. I spoke to the rest of 8OTR and he became a member. A few line-up changes followed and it was just Nolan and I – we decided to look for a drummer. We found Chinlen Singh through an ad I placed on RSJ [the now defunct magazine]. It was then that we decided 8OTR sucked. We needed a better name that would reflect what we were into and what we intended to write.”

On Bangalore:
“Bangalore, then & now (not so much), is pretty much a classic rock/metal town. It was not odd to hear Slayer, Megadeth, Dio, Black Sabbath being played at pubs – hell! I have even heard Death’s Symbolic at a bar in Bangalore. There was a legendary wall on Brigade Road where someone had spray painted SLAYER. From college benches to pub loos, it was not out-of-the-place to find AC/DC, GN’R, Slayer, Scorpions, etc. There was a healthy local metal scene with bands like Millenium, Crimson Storm, Vulcan Haze, W.A.R.D.E.N, etc gigging. There were numerous pubs and bars that played everything from heavy blues, hard rock to early metal. There was no scene, but the seeds were sown.”

Being a part of  compilations:
Headbangalore’ was a compilation of Bangalore bands Phallusy, Threinody, Myndsnare and Kryptos. Forsaken, Forgotten (land of ice) and Clandestine Elements were the 3 tracks by Kryptos that were part of the compilation. “We were siting around Threinody’s rehearsal space, which we shared with them for a while, drinking beer and shooting the breeze when we decided that we could actually go out and do a fucking compilation.The effort was great; the involvement was spot on, but the studio and the mixing engineer sucked. The release was well received though we were never really studio ready, but then what mattered back then was the DIY approach – people dug it.”

“Back then, the only gigs that were happening were college and other miscellaneous competitions. We took part in as many. We didn’t give two hoots about winning and all that; we just wanted to play live. The law of averages caught up and won a few. One of the prizes was that we could record a couple of songs at this studio called Throatlatch Studios in Navi Mumbai. The owners then released one of the songs, Descension, on a compilation called Deep Throat.”

10 years of Spiral Ascent:
“Man, that album took forever to record. I don’t remember the sequence of events but we recorded and tracked everywhere! From Warren’s [Mendonsa] place in Dadar to a few studios in Bangalore, including Ricky Kej’s – he is a Grammy winner today – w00t! Looking back, how I wish we had someone to whoop our arses and helped us save time and money, but I would do it all over again. No regrets.”
“Few Indian bands had released albums a decade ago. “How? We just did. There were quite a few Indian bands that released original music before us. From Thermal and a Quarter to Millennium, Rock Machine to Vulcan Haze. We felt we have 8 odd songs, let’s just put it out and get on with it.”

On the line-up for the album:

“Chinglen Singh had to leave Bangalore and head back to Assam due to personal reasons. Ryan Colaco was then with Angel Dust, we asked him to moonlight for a couple of gigs we had coming. And that was that. With Akshay it was a bit more complicated. I had heard of this guy who’d come to Kryptos gigs, record it and bootleg. I loved that! I am not sure how we met, if he auditioned or whatever – but before we knew he was there. A great guitar player with quite a personality.”

On Writing for the album:
“We never sat down and said, ‘hey! Enough of the beer! Let’s write an album!’ It happened over time, when we had enough material we began the recording process.”

Spiral Ascent

On Recording the album:
The album was recorded by Clay Kelton at his studio. “Took a couple of weeks, months maybe. The process was an on-the-go one – oh Ryan’s here today, eh? Let’s track the drums! Or ‘is that Tiny (Trinity D’Souza, Cryptic)? Dude, play a solo here!’ So, it was all over the place – quite a miracle we actually put something out. Those days were a bloody haze. Bet there are a few. I remember setting Akshay’s vodka on fire once, don’t know why or what happened after. But Clay didn’t like it much.”

On the album art:
“The cover art was design by Niklas Sundin (Dark Tranquillity). Being fans of DT’s early work – musically and cover art-wise, we decided to mail him for fucks sake. When he replied it was like ‘Woah! We need to pay him money now!”

If they had to change anything…
“Apart from playing to a metronome, not a bloody thing.”

Parting words:
“Eat shit, drink beer and bark at the moon! Also, buy our merch!”

This week Kryptos head to Germany on tour with Death Angel. Those in the area should definitely head to one of the show, tour dates are below.

Kryptos Europe tour poster 2015

Written by trendcrusher

July 14, 2015 at 10:00 am

Introducing: Corpse Garden

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Corpse Garden

Who: Corpse Garden The band consists of Felipe Tencio (Vocals), Carlos Venegas (Bass), Federico Gutierrez (Guitar), Esteban Sancho (Guitar) and Erick Mejia (Drums)

Where: Heredia, Costa Rica

What: “First of, ‘Entheogen’ is a chemical substance that is used in spiritual rites or such to aim for transcendence, so,  under that premise the record talks about the stages that are performed in the Alchemy’s Magna Opus and also about theories of Individuation by psychologist Carl Jung.” said drummer Erick Mejia describing their second album.

How: “It was extensive, it took from mid 2012 to late 2013 to compose and write the songs for the record and to come up with the concept.” said Erick about the songwriting process for the album. “In between we got the line-up changes that were good for the band but there’s always a little bit of a ‘learning curve’ so to speak, musicians need to get used to the band and hopefully that was incredibly fast.”

“A lot of hard work, we really wanted something very specific for this record and that had a lot to do with our performances on each instrument so we needed to play as good and precise as we could.” said Erick about the recording process for the album. “Also we experimented a lot with effects, ebows, synths and so on and so forth, so, those we needed to be very careful not to over do something and get it just right and just the right amount.Recording took around 6 months all together:  recording, mixing and mastering.”

Listen to ‘Entheogen’ below

 

Written by trendcrusher

July 10, 2015 at 10:00 am

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